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by adam mathes  ·  subscribe  ·  RSS  ·  archive

Prisoners of the Perpetual Present

There’s no memory at Twitter: everything is fleeting. Though that concept may seem daunting to some (archivists, I feel your pain), it also means the content in my feed is an endless stream of new information, either comments on what is happening right now or thoughts about the future. One of the reasons I loved the Internet when I first discovered it in the mid-1990s was that it was a clean slate, a place that welcomed all regardless of your past as you wrote your new life story; where you’d only be judged on your words and your art and your photos going forward.

Facebook is mired in the past. My spouse resisted Facebook for many years and recently I got to watch over her shoulder as she signed up for an account. They asked her about her birth and where she grew up and what schools she attended, who her family might be. By the end of the process, she was asking me how this website figured out her entire social circles in high school and college. It was more than a little creepy, but that’s where her experience began.

Matt Haughey, Why I love Twitter and barely tolerate Facebook

Facebook forces people to live as prisoners of the perpetual present.

It’s particularly rough on people like me who first used the web as an escape from these geographically defined pasts.